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29两只麻雀不是卖一个大钱吗?但你们的父若不许可,一只也不会掉在地上。
29Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father.
29 Verse 29. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing?] ασσαριου.

A Roman AS was one-tenth of a DENARIUS, which was about

sevenpence-halfpenny, and one-tenth of sevenpence-halfpenny makes

just three farthings.



The word ασσαριον, which we translate farthing, is found among

the rabbins in the word aisar, which, according to

Maimonides, is equal to four grains of silver, but is used among

them to express a thing of the lowest, or almost no value. Our

Lord seems to have borrowed the expression, One of them shall not

fall on the ground, &c., from his own countrymen. In Bereshith

Rabba, sec. 79, fol. 77, it is said: In the time in which the Jews

were compelled to apostatize, Rab. Simeon, Ben. Jochai, and

Eliezer his son hid themselves in a cave, and lived upon dry

husks. After thirteen years they came out; and, sitting at the

mouth of the cave, they observed a fowler stretching his nets to

catch birds; and as often as the Bath Kol said dimos,

escape! the bird escaped; but when it said spicula, a dart,

the bird was taken. Then the rabbin said, Even a bird is not

taken without Heaven, i.e. without the will of God, how much less

the life of man! The doctrine intended to be inculcated is this:

The providence of God extends to the minutest things; every thing

is continually under the government and care of God, and nothing

occurs without his will or permission; if then he regards

sparrows, how much more man, and how much more still the soul that

trusts in him!



Fall on the ground] Instead of επιτηνγην, Origen, Clement,

Chrysostom, Juvencus, and six MSS. of Mathai, read ειςτηνπαγιδα

into a snare. Bengel conjectures that it might have been written

at first, επιτηνπαγην; that the first syllable πα being lost out

of the word, γην, the earth, instead of παγην, snare, became

the common reading.



Without your Father.] Without the will of your Father: της

βουλης, the will or counsel, is added here by Origen, Coptic,

all the Arabic, latter Persic, Gothic, all the Itala except two;

Tert., Iren., Cypr., Novatian, and other Latin fathers. If the

evidence be considered as insufficient to entitle it to admission

into the text, let it stand there as a supplementary italic word,

necessary to make the meaning of the place evident.



All things are ordered by the counsel of God. This is a great

consolation to those who are tried and afflicted. The belief of

an all-wise, all-directing Providence, is a powerful support under

the most grievous accidents of life. Nothing escapes his merciful

regards, not even the smallest things of which he may be said to

be only the creator and preserver; how much less those of whom he

is the Father, Saviour, and endless felicity!

See Clarke on Lu 12:7.