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23迦百农啊!你会被高举到天上吗?你必降到阴间。在你那里行过的神迹,如果行在所多玛,那城还会存留到今天。
23And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.
23 Verse 23. Thou, Capernaum-exalted unto heaven] A Hebrew

metaphor, expressive of the utmost prosperity, and the enjoyment

of the greatest privileges. This was properly spoken of this

city, because that in it our Lord dwelt, and wrought many of his

miraculous works.



Shalt be brought down to hell] Perhaps not meaning, here, the

place of torment, but rather a state of desolation. The original

word is Hades, αδης, from α, not, and ιδειν, to see;

the invisible receptacle or mansion of the dead, answering to

sheol, in Hebrew; and implying often, 1st. the grave; 2dly. the

state of separate souls, or unseen world of spirits, whether of

torment, Lu 16:23,

or, in general, Re 1:18; 6:8; 20:13, 14.

The word hell, used in the common translation, conveys now an

improper meaning of the original word; because hell is only used

to signify the place of the damned. But, as the word hell comes

from the Anglo-Saxon, helan, to cover, or hide, hence the tiling

or slating of a house is called, in some parts of England

(particularly Cornwall) heling, to this day; and the covers of

books (in Lancashire) by the same name: so the literal import of

the original word αδης was formerly well expressed by it.

Here it means a state of the utmost wo, and ruin, and desolation,

to which these impenitent cities should be reduced. This

prediction of our Lord was literally fulfilled; for, in the wars

between the Romans and the Jews, these cities were totally

destroyed, so that no traces are now found of Bethsaida, Chorazin,

or Capernaum. See Bp. PEARCE.