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其他的比喻

44“天国好像藏在田里的宝贝,有人发现了,就把它藏起来,高高兴兴地离去,变卖了他的一切,来买那田地。




44Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto treasure hid in a field; the which when a man hath found, he hideth, and for joy thereof goeth and selleth all that he hath, and buyeth that field.
44 Verse 44. The kingdom of heaven is like unto treasure hid in a

field] θησαυρωκεκρυμμενω, to a hidden treasure. We are not to

imagine that the treasure here mentioned, and to which the

Gospel salvation is likened, means a pot or chest of money hidden

in the field, but rather a gold or silver mine, which he who found

out could not get at, or work, without turning up the field, and

for this purpose he bought it. Mr. Wakefield's observation is

very just: "There is no sense in the purchase of a field for a pot

of money, which he might have carried away with him very readily,

and as honestly, too, as by overreaching the owner by an unjust

purchase."



He hideth-i.e. he kept secret, told the discovery to no person,

till he had bought the field. From this view of the subject, the

translation of this verse, given above, will appear proper-a

hidden treasture, when applied to a rich mine, is more proper than

a treasure hid, which applies better to a pot of money deposited

there, which I suppose was our translators' opinion; and kept

secret, or concealed, will apply better to the subject of his

discovery till he made the purchase, than hideth, for which there

could be no occasion, when the pot was already hidden, and the

place known only to himself.



Our Lord's meaning seems to be this:-



The kingdom of heaven-the salvation provided by the Gospel-is

like a treasure-something of inestimable worth-hidden in a field;

it is a rich mine, the veins of which run in all directions in the

sacred Scriptures; therefore, the field must be dug up, the

records of salvation diligently and carefully turned over, and

searched. Which, when a man hath found-when a sinner is convinced

that the promise of life eternal is to him, he kept secret-pondered

the matter deeply in his heart; he examines the preciousness of the

treasure, and counts the cost of purchase; for joy thereof-finding

that this salvation is just what his needy soul requires, and what

will make him presently and eternally happy, went and sold all

that he had-renounces his sins, abandons his evil companions, and

relinquishes all hope of salvation through his own righteousness;

and purchased that field-not merely bought the book for the sake

of the salvation it described, but, by the blood of the covenant,

buys gold tried in the fire, white raiment, &c.; in a word, pardon

and purity, which he receives from God for the sake of Jesus. We

should consider the salvation of God, 1. As our only treasure, and

value it above all the riches in the world. 2. Search for it in

the Scriptures, till we fully understand its worth and excellence.

3. Deeply ponder it in the secret of our souls. 4. Part with all

we have in order to get it. 5. Place our whole joy and felicity

in it; and 6. Be always convinced that it must be bought, and that

no price is accepted for it but the blood of the covenant; the

sufferings and death of our only Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.