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8有的落在好土里,结出果实,有一百倍的,有六十倍的,有三十倍的。
8But other fell into good ground, and brought forth fruit, some an hundredfold, some sixtyfold, some thirtyfold.
8 Verse 8. Good ground] Where the earth was deep, the field well

ploughed, and the brambles and weeds all removed.

See more on , &c., and see on .



Some a hundred-fold.] For the elucidation of this text, I beg

leave to introduce the following experiment. In 1816 I sowed, for

a third crop, a field with oats, at Millbrook, in Lancashire; the

grains weighed, on an average, 3/4 of a grain each. One grain

produced three stalks with three ears: the largest had 68 grains

in it, the second 26, and the third 25.



Whole number of grains 119, which together

weighed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 grs

The root separately, after washing and

drying, weighed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1/2

The stalks and remaining leaves (for many

had perished in the wet season) . . . . . 630 1/2

-------

Weight of the whole produce of one grain

of oats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726 grs.



which was 725 times and one quarter more than the original weight.



The power of grain to multiply itself, even in the same year,

is a subject as much of curiosity and astonishment as of

importance and general utility. For the farther elucidation of

this text, I shall give the following example from a practice in

agriculture, or rural economy, which is termed filtering.



On the 2nd of June, 1766, Mr. C. Miller, of Cambridge, sowed

some grains of the common, red wheat; and on the 8th of August a

single plant was taken up, and separated into 18 parts, and each

planted separately: these plants having pushed out several side

shoots, about the middle of September some of them were taken up

and divided; and the rest between that time and October. This

second division produced 67 plants. These plants remained through

the winter, and another division of them, made between the middle

of March and the 12th of April, produced 500 plants. They were

divided no farther, but permitted to remain in the field. These

plants were in general stronger than any of the wheat in the

field. Some of them produced upwards of 100 ears from a single

root and many of the ears measured seven inches in length, and

contained between sixty and seventy grains. The whole number of

ears produced from the single plant was 21,109, which yielded

three pecks and three-quarters of clear corn, weighing 47lbs.

7oz., and, from a calculation made by counting the grains in an

ounce, the whole number of grains was about 576,840. Mr. Miller

thinks that, had he made a second division in the spring, the

number of plants would have amounted to 2000. Who can help

admiring the wisdom and providence of God in this single grain of

corn! He has, in some sort, impressed on it an idea of his own

infinity; and an idea which, like the subject to which it refers,

confounds our imagination and reason. How infinitely great is

God, even in his minor works.