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里面的光(路11:34-36)

22“眼睛就是身体的灯。如果你的眼睛健全,全身就都明亮;
22The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light.
22 Verse 22. The light of the body is the eye] That is, the eye

is to the body what the sun is to the universe in the day time, or

a lamp or candle to a house at night.



If-thine eye be single] απλους, simple, uncompounded; i.e. so

perfect in its structure as to see objects distinctly and clearly,

and not confusedly, or in different places to what they are, as is

often the case in certain disorders of the eye; one object

appearing two or more-or else in a different situation, and of a

different colour to what it really is. This state of the eye is

termed, Mt 6:23,

πονηρος evil, i.e. diseased or defective. An evil eye

was a phrase in use, among the ancient Jews, to denote an envious,

covetous man or disposition; a man who repined at his neighbour's

prosperity, loved his own money, and would do nothing in the way

of charity for God's sake. Our blessed Lord, however, extends and

sublimes this meaning, and uses the sound eye as a metaphor to

point out that simplicity of intention, and purity of affection

with which men should pursue the supreme good. We cannot draw

more than one straight line between two indivisible points. We

aim at happiness: it is found only in one thing, the indivisible

and eternal GOD. It the line of simple intention be drawn

straight to him, and the soul walk by it, with purity of

affection, the whole man shall be light in the Lord; the rays of

that excellent glory shall irradiate the mind, and through the

whole spirit shall the Divine nature be transfused. But if a

person who enjoyed this heavenly treasure permit his simplicity of

intention to deviate from heavenly to earthly good; and his purity

of affection to be contaminated by worldly ambition, secular

profits, and animal gratifications; then, the light which was in

him becomes darkness, i.e. his spiritual discernment departs, and

his union with God is destroyed: all is only a palpable obscure;

and, like a man who has totally lost his sight, he walks without

direction, certainty, or comfort. This state is most forcibly

intimated in our Lord's exclamation, How great a darkness! Who

can adequately describe the misery and wretchedness of that soul

which has lost its union with the fountain of all good, and, in

losing this, has lost the possibility of happiness till the simple

eye be once more given, and the straight line once more drawn.