Select Commentary| Adam Clarke's Commentary on the Bible| Mat| Chapter 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 |
Total 34 verses in Chapter 6: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 |
ChiUnsKJVClarke
27你们 那一个 能 用思虑 使寿数 多加 一 刻 呢(或作:使身量多加一肘呢)?
27Which of you by taking thought can add one cubit unto his stature?
27 Verse 27. Which of you by taking thought can add one cubit unto

his stature?] The third reason against these carking cares is the

unprofitableness of human solicitude, unless God vouchsafe to

bless it. What can our uneasiness do but render us still more

unworthy of the Divine care? The passage from distrust to

apostasy is very short and easy; and a man is not far from

murmuring against Providence, who is dissatisfied with its

conduct. We should depend as fully upon God for the preservation

of his gifts as for the gifts themselves.



Cubit unto his stature?] I think ηλικιαν should be rendered age

here, and so our translators have rendered the word in Joh 9:21,

αυτοςηλικιανεχει he is of age. A very learned writer

observes, that no difficulty can arise from applying πηχυν a

cubit, a measure of extension, to time, and the age of man:

as place and time are both quantities, and capable of increase

and diminution, and, as no fixed material standard can be employed

in the mensuration of the fleeting particles of time, it was

natural and necessary, in the construction of language, to apply

parallel terms to the discrimination of time and place.

Accordingly, we find the same words indifferently used to denote

time and place in every known tongue. Lord, let me know the

MEASURE of my days! Thou hast made my days HAND-BREADTHS,

Ps 39:5.

Many examples might be adduced from the Greek and Roman writers.

Besides, it is evident that the phrase of adding one cubit is

proverbial, denoting something minute; and is therefore applicable

to the smallest possible portion of time; but, in a literal

acceptation, the addition of a cubit to the stature, would be a

great and extraordinary accession of height. See Wakefield.

Home | Search | GSword